The War of 1812 in Detroit / War of 1812 Grave Site

Registered Site S0242

The War of 1812 in Detroit

On June 18, 1812, the United States Congress declared war on Great Britain. William Hull, Michigan’s first territorial governor, was selected to lead the U.S. army. He invaded Canada on July 12, but soon lost battles south of Detroit and withdrew. On August 16, 1812, the British attacked Fort Detroit. Hull surrendered. Britain governed the city under martial law until Oliver Hazard Perry gained control of the upper Great Lakes in September 1813. The American forces returned to Detroit and launched a successful invasion of Canada. The citizens of Detroit lived in an uneasy peace until they learned, on February 20, 1815, of the December 24, 1814, signing of the Treaty of Ghent. On March 29 they celebrated with a “Great Pacification Ball.”
photo of The War of 1812 in Detroit

War of 1812 Grave Site

In reaction to Oliver Hazard Perry’s Lake Erie victory, the British withdrew from Detroit on September 26, 1813, setting fire to the buildings within the fort and the Citadel. Three days later United States troops returned to a city that lacked housing and food supplies. A disease, probably cholera, broke out among the soldiers. By December 1, 1813, an estimated 1,300 of them were ill. The medical supplies were soon depleted; conditions worsened. When coffins became unattainable, many soldiers were buried in a common grave at this site. Some 700 may have died before the epidemic finally ran its course. This grave site was identified in 1987 during an archaeological survey for the People Mover that found four burials associated with the War of 1812.

1964 text:
Hardship struck soon after American troops regained Detroit on Sept. 29, 1813, during the War of 1812. Soldiers quarters were lacking, and food supplies became desperately short. Then a disease resembling cholera broke out among the soldiers. By Dec. 1, 1813, nearly 1,300 officers and men were sick. Medical supplies were almost gone. Conditions worsened. When coffins became unobtainable, many soldiers were buried in a common grave at this site. Some 700 may have died before the epidemic ran its course.

Erected 1964

Location: Washington Boulevard and Michigan Avenue
Detroit, Wayne County

Topics:
Cemeteries

Latitude: 42.3318426, Longitude: -83.0509114

© 2019 - MichMarkers.com